RARE Footage: Ex-Slaves talk about slavery in America

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Published on September 26, 2019 by
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In honor of Juneteenth (since national attention is now on it), here’s ex-slaves talk about slavery in America.

Shocking stories.

From an ABC report back in 1999…


If you want further insight, check our book recommendations:

And speaking of slavery, the best way to be free today is the be financially free. Here’s how you can pull it off.

 

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JEAN L JONES
1 year ago

The Narrative of this article still continues to perpetrate negative concepts of the slave population. I will address only two. First Africas were never unskilled workers. When they were taken from Africa and brought to this Country, they were highly skilled. They were road builders, house builders able to plant and harvest. They could train horses and had various domestic skills. To not acknowledge that this population of people brought into this country unsurpassed skills that were lacking ,again perpetrates the idea that what was brought here were nothing more than dumb humans that were taught everything by their European taskmaster. Most of them that were of age could read and write in their own language and that was stolen from them through years of not being able to continue to pass this culture on generation after generation due to slavery. Africans became enslaved after reaching America and as a result existed this era with a language learned by interacting with European of diverse linguistic skills.
Secondly this statement of giving this freed Africa population right to go to public school somewhat lack knowledge of history. The narrative should reflect that during the reformation, Africans had a significant impact in the legislative branch . At that time they passed laws that allowed a public school system in the United States to be developed for Caucasian and African ethnicities. Africans began to found and build Colleges and universities as early as 1865. Consider Fisk university and MeHarry Medical College in Nashville, TN. It was Africans that opposed the idea of a racially integrated educational system.
The narrative does not accurately reflect the true picture before, during and after the time using enslaved African skills and labor to build the economic base of this country. It tend to ingrain once again that Africans had no value except what now one may need to believe to further put whites in a position of being superior.

Jody
1 year ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Well said.

tasha
1 year ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES
Gayle
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Very well articulated and factual! Thank you!

Diane
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Thank you for your comment. I think you are 100% right. I would not have thought of your points on my own. Growing up white in the south in 40s – 60s, segregated schools, my education covered very little with slavery. We learned about George Washington Carver only him. I’m curious about the process of African slaves learning English. Any suggestions on where I can find this info?

Cassandra
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

How were these skills you say they had in the Mother country passed down? Slavery in what became the United States probably began with the arrival of “20 and odd” enslaved Africans to the British colony of Virginia, in 1619. It officially ended with the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1865. Yes, there were a few slaves who did well after being set free but the majority only knew how to work in the field. The few who did well, in most cases, could read and write which gave them an advantage.

CubanFlowers
7 months ago
Reply to  Cassandra

hi… it may have “officially” ended in 1865 but.. people were still enslaved… because some american states.. didn’t get the memo!……….not to mention…many people were tossed to concentration camps………..and…that 1 american state named Mississippi just ended the slavery.. in 2013… citing a clerical error…….. be blessed

Ann Bell
5 months ago
Reply to  CubanFlowers

Thank you for that valuable information!!

Gene M. Todd Jr.
4 months ago
Reply to  Cassandra

And the issue of African slaves being sold to European slavers by other Africans always seems to be omitted or minimized. So much info has been “adjusted” to push personal points… And take factual history down a long rabbit hole for inflaming an issue that a white Republican President ended up stopping and being assasinated for… Somehow Democrats have kept the hate flames burning… Those Wiley socialists are still doing it

Janice Malone
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

“You can’t give me the right to be a human being…” That statement alone speaks volumes.

Linda Maguire
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Thank you for sharing some long overlooked truths about the African people brought to our country as slaves. Many of us fail to take into account that the first generation arriving here, were rarely given opportunities to educate and pass along skills they had in their native country to their children. I’m grateful that their history was preserved and passed along until such time as they could be put into print.

Judy Milner
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Absolutely agree

Judy Milner
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Hauling shit was not the only thing we were skilled to do. Another slick attempt to degrade disguised in admitting the white man is evil, inhuman and used barbaric practices to enslave other humans for profits

Mickey
7 months ago
Reply to  Judy Milner

That’s actually not what he said. You should probably listen to that part again it’s at 9.50.

Myreon Williams
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Those ‘skilled’ types of jobs did not become prevalent until AFTER slavery ended. What about the large majority who simply picked cotton? How the f#%k is that a ‘skill’? How about the women raped? Was that a skill. Thank you for your ridiculous rendition of ‘whitesplanin’ the upside of slavery – SMDH

yogiman
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

There was also many free Negroes in the USA during the time of slavery.

CubanFlowers
7 months ago
Reply to  yogiman

sweetie hi.. to you again… yes… and many of those free Negro was.. kidnapped… and sold into bondage!….. FYI.. multitudes of MANY black people were here ….living in the americasssss long before.. pink face came on the scene… to mash up the place!….. be blessed

Bridgett Carter
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

My thoughts exactly! The narrative only described a few. We’re still surviving!

Krystal
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Sister, thank you for this most insightful and completely accurate information.

Dionne
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

So well said!!

J. Byrd
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

The TRUTH SEEM TO ALWAYS COME TO THE LIGHT.

Tsmith
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Very well said

Craig Gosling
7 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Slavery was not invented by slave traders or plantation owners or American industrialists. It was common in Asia and Africa, it was a way of tribal life. Slavery existed around the world since the dawn of man, in most ancient civilizations. Slavery was sanctioned and sponsored by most religions. There is probably less slavery today than any other time in history. So maybe we are making progress.

Dannymayfield
7 months ago
Reply to  Craig Gosling

Wait just a minute Mr. Craig do you see how black people was treated the end and it’s still that way today just a new era

Carl A. Epps
5 months ago
Reply to  JEAN L JONES

Thank you, for the TRUTH. Yes we must stop the words that don’t speak the truth about us.

Paula
1 year ago

Recording these first person accounts of slavery was a critical contribution of the WPA, I believe. I am always struck by the strength of character conveyed in their voices, the intelligence of the context they provide and the wonderful richness in the actual language. The wealth of this young country was indeed built on the strong and smart labor of men, women and children in slavery.

Stacy Allen
1 year ago

This was very interesting! Please run it on tv once again! It needs to be shown in classrooms everywhere and on heavy rotation! I don’t think African American youth understand the true struggle and how grateful they should be for all of those people who endured the horrors of Slavery!

Dannymayfield
7 months ago
Reply to  Stacy Allen

I agree these kids today wouldn’t understand that I love this comment

Dannymayfield
7 months ago
Reply to  Dannymayfield

Thank you Stacy Allen

Jean
7 months ago
Reply to  Stacy Allen

I think white children should also be taught as well since their parents were not given that option…

Trash
7 months ago

Did this racist commentator say “ unskilled Labor” has he lost his mind, cotton didn’t need unskilled labor! And you know that Tom! White America wanted Free Labor! Cotton didn’t need unskilled Labor, you racist media mister liar! White America wanted free Labor for its cotton!!!!!! This is how lying History moves forward!

Donna Dooley-Glenn
7 months ago
Reply to  Trash

Not all whites owned slaves. Many poor white people picked cotton also. If you check history you will find that wealthy Native Americans owned many slaves too. In fact when they were sent on the Trail of Tears they took their slaves with them and they became a part of the tribe.
Most white people feel sick to our stomachs when reading the history of slavery and the treatment of the Native Americans. How a human being could treat another human being with such disregard is horrifying. The trauma they suffered at the hands of greedy white men is something I as a white person cannot even imagine and am very heartbroken and ashamed. Thank goodness for Martin Luther King and many others who did stand up and say enough and demanded change. Saying sorry will never be enough to wipe the hurts away but I as a white person am sorry.

Julia R.Wright Wright
7 months ago

Thanks. Continuing in shame doesn’t do anything but place you in bondage. Yes, the history of America and the treatment of African Americans was inhumane! To me, this is an indication of how inhumane the perpetrators felt about themselves. They were ashamed of humanity! However, we must heal from the wounds of racism! WE are from the same SOURCE! Just a unique expression of the Source!

Patrick
1 year ago

My grandmother was born in 1888. Her mother was a slave.

EnJayBe
7 months ago
Reply to  Patrick

ENslaved. They were African people, not slaves.

Ron
7 months ago

Thank you my Great Grandmother was born in 1870 passed in 1973, what she must have felt seeing all of us Free.

Cassandra
7 months ago

Very good article. Let out like cattle and started new lives. Powerful narrative.

Linda Maguire
7 months ago

Thank you for shedding more light on this history.

Donna
1 year ago

Thank you for shareing

Phyllis
10 months ago

Thank you for this.